THAILAND
Law
  •  


     

    สั่งซื้อหนังสือภาษาไทยได้แล้วที่ Kinokuniya.tarad.com



ยินดีต้อนรับผู้เข้าชม | เข้าสู่ระบบ
ค้นหา
ขั้นสูง
Haunt 3 (Haunt): Kirkman, Robert/ McFarlane, Todd (CRT)/ Capullo, Greg (ILT): BOOKS KINOKUNIYA
รายละเอียดหนังสือ
Haunt 3 (Haunt)
Haunt 3 (Haunt)
สำนักพิมพ์ : Image Comics
วันที่ตีพิมพ์ : 2012/06
Binding : Paperback
เลขที่ISBN : 9781607065524

ราคาบนระบบBookWeb : THB 516.00
ราคาสำหรับสมาชิกบัตร KPC : THB 464.00

ข้อมูลสินค้าในคลัง : มีสินค้าในร้าน ปกติใช้เวลาประมาณ 3 วันทำการเพื่อจัดส่ง
ภาษา : English
Stock Information
Store Shelf Location Click here Stock
Siam Paragon CM023 Map
Sukhumvit EB164 Map
Bangkok -
Important
  • While every attempt has been made to ensure stock availability, occasionally we do run out of stock at our stores.
  • Retail store and online prices may vary.
  • To confirm availability and pricing, please call the store directly.
Retail Store Contact Details and Operating Hours

รายละเอียดหนังสือ
Source: ENG

The top-selling monthly title brings its third knock-out story arc to trade paperback format. The Kilgore brothers settle into their newfound power, but nothing is ever easy in the world of Haunt. The mysterious creature, The Apparition, relentlessly chases down the duo. However, a new ally may have the answers to The Apparition's defeat. Featuring art from master storyteller Greg Capullo, "Haunt Volume 3" is the next great edition to any Haunt fan's library.Yet, these countries, unwilling to bear an opportunity cost of this magnitude, continue to impose a grievously unjust global institutional order that foreseeably and avoidably perpetuates the catastrophe. Most citizens of affluent countries believe that we are doing nothing wrong. Thomas Pogge seeks to explain how this belief is sustained. He analyses how our moral and economic theorizing and our global economic order have adapted to make us appear disconnected from massive poverty abroad. Dispelling the illusion, he also offers a modest, widely sharable standard of global economic justice and makes detailed, realistic proposals toward fulfilling it.Thoroughly updated, the second edition of this classic book incorporates responses to critics and a new chapter introducing Pogge's current work on pharmaceutical patent reform.

Contents
Introduction. I Some Cautions About Our Moral Judgements. II Four Easy Reasons to Ignore World Poverty. III Sophisticated Defenses of our acquiescence in world poverty. IV Does Our New Global Economic Order Really Not Harm the Poor?. V Responsibilities and Reforms. Chapter 1: Human Flourishing and Universal Justice . 1. 0 Introduction. 1. 1 Social Justice. 1. 2 Paternalism. 1. 3 Justice in First Approximation. 1. 4 Essential Refinements. 1. 5 Human Rights. 1. 6 Specification of Human Rights and Responsibilities for their Realization. 1. 7 Conclusion. Chapter 2: How Should Human Rights be Conceived? . 2. 0 Introduction. 2. 1 From Natural Law to Rights. 2. 2 From Natural Rights to Human Rights. 2. 3 Official Disrespect. 2. 4 The Libertarian Critique of Social and Economic Rights. 2. 5 The Critique of Social and Economic Rights as 'Manifesto Rights'. 2. 6 Disputes about Kinds of Human Rights. Chapter 3: Loopholes in Moralities . 3. 0 Introduction. 3. 1 Types of Incentives. 3. 2 Loopholes. 3. 3 Social Arrangements. 3. 4 Case 1: The Converted Apartment Building. 3. 5 Case 2: The Homelands Policy of White South Africa. 3. 6 An Objection. 3. 7 Strengthening. 3. 8 Fictional Histories. 3. 9 Puzzles of Equivalence. 3. 10 Conclusion. Chapter 4: Moral Universalism and Global Economic Justice . 4. 0 Introduction. 4. 1 Moral Universalism. 4. 2 Our Moral Assessment of National and Global Economic Orders. 4. 3 Some Factual Background about the Global Economic Order. 4. 3. 1 The Extent of World Poverty. 4. 3. 2 The Extent of Global Inequality. 4. 3. 3 Trends in World Poverty and Inequality. 4. 4 Conceptions of National and Global Economic Justice Contrasted. 4. 5 Moral Universalism and David Miller's Contextualism. 4. 6 Contextualist Moral Universalism and John Rawls's Moral Conception. 4. 7 Rationalizing Divergent Moral Conceptions Through a Double Standard. 4. 8 Rationalizing Divergent Moral Conceptions Without a Double Standard. 4. 9 The Causal Role of Global Institutions in the Persistence of Severe Poverty. 4. 10 Conclusion. Chapter 5: The Bounds of Nationalism . 5. 0 Introduction. 5. 1 Common Nationalism - Priority for the Interests of Compatriots. 5. 2 Lofty Nationalism - The Justice-for-Compatriots Priority. 5. 3 Explanatory Nationalism - The Deep Significance of National Borders. 5. 4 Conclusion. Chapter 6: Achieving Democracy . 6. 0 Introduction. 6. 1 The Structure of the Problem Faced by Fledgling Democracies. 6. 2 Reducing the Expected Rewards of Coups d'Etat. 6. 3 Undermining the Borrowing Privilege of Authoritarian Predators. 6. 3. 1 The Criterial Problem. 6. 3. 2 The Tit-For-Tat Problem. 6. 3. 3 The Establishment Problem. 6. 3. 4 Synthesis. 6. 4 Undermining the Resource Privilege of Authoritarian Predators. 6. 5 Conclusion. Chapter 7: Cosmopolitanism and Sovereignty . 7. 0 Introduction. 7. 1 Institutional Cosmopolitanism Based on Human Rights. 7. 2 The Idea of State Sovereignty. 7. 3 Some Main Reasons for a Vertical Dispersal of Sovereignty. 7. 3. 1 Peace and Security. 7. 3. 2 Reducing Oppression. 7. 3. 3 Global Economic Justice. 7. 3. 4 Ecology/Democracy. 7. 4 The Shaping and Reshaping of Political Units. 7. 5 Conclusion. Chapter 8: Eradicating Systemic Poverty: Brief for a Global Resources Dividend . 8. 0 Introduction. 8. 1 Radical Inequality and Our Responsibility. 8. 2 Three Grounds of Injustice. 8. 2. 1 The Effects of Shared Social Institutions. 8. 2. 2 Uncompensated Exclusion from the Use of Natural Resources. 8. 2. 3 The Effects of a Common and Violent History. 8. 3 A Moderate Proposal. 8. 4 The Moral Argument for the Proposed Reform. 8. 5 Is the Reform Proposal Realistic?. 8. 6 Conclusion. Chapter 9: Pharmaceutical Innovation: Must We Exclude the Poor? . 9.0 Introduction. 9.1 The TRIPS Agreement and its aftermath. 9.2 The argument from beneficial consequences. 9.3 Toward a better way of stimulating research and development of essential medicines. 9.4 Differential pricing. 9.5 The public-good strategy for extending access to essential medicines. 9.6 A full-pull plan for the provision of pharmaceuticals. 9.7 Specifying and implementing the basic full-pull idea. 9.8 Justifying the plan to affluent citizens and their representatives. Last Words. Notes. Bibliography. Index5.4.18 Reactive Absorption 106 5.4.19 Reactive Distillation 106 5.4.20 Membrane-Assisted Reactive Distillation 106 5.4.21 Hydrodynamic Cavitation Reactors 106 5.4.22 Pulsed Compression Reactor 107 5.4.23 Sonochemical Reactors 107 5.4.24 Ultrasound-Enhanced Crystallization 108 5.4.25 Electric Field-Enhanced Extraction 108 5.4.26 Induction and Ohmic Heating 108 5.4.27 Microwave Drying 109 5.4.28 Microwave-Enhanced Separation and Microwave Reactors 109 5.4.29 Photochemical Reactors 110 5.4.30 Oscillatory Baffled Reactor Technologies 111 5.4.31 Reverse Flow Reactor Operation 111 5.4.32 Pulse Combustion Drying 111 5.4.33 Supercritical Separation 112 5.5 Conclusions 113 References 113 6. Process Intensification in the Chemical and Petrochemical Industry 119 Angelo Basile, Adolfo Iulianelli, and Liguori Simona 6.1 Introduction 119 6.2 Process Intensification 120 6.2.1 Definition and Principles 120 6.2.2 Components 121 6.3 The Membrane Role 122 6.4 Membrane Reactor 124 6.4.1 Membrane Reactor and Process Intensification 126 6.4.2 Membrane Reactor Benefits 127 6.5 Applications of Membrane Reactors in the Petrochemical Industry 128 6.5.1 Dehydrogenation Reactions 129 6.5.2 Oxidative Coupling of Methane 134 6.5.3 Methane Steam Reforming 135 6.5.4 Water Gas Shift 137 6.6 Process Intensification in Chemical Industry 139 6.6.1 Reactive Distillation 139 6.6.2 Reactive Extraction 140 6.6.3 Reactive Adsorption 140 6.6.4 Hybrid Separation 141 6.7 Future Trends 141 6.8 Conclusion 142 Nomenclature 143 References 143 7. Production of Bio-Based Fuels: Bioethanol and Biodiesel 153 Sudip Chakraborty, Ranjana Das Mondal, Debolina Mukherjee, and Chiranjib Bhattacharjee 7.1 Introduction 153 7.1.1 Importance of Biofuel as a Renewable Energy Source 153 7.2 Production of Bioethanol 155 7.2.1 Bioethanol from Biomass: Production, Processes, and Limitations 156 7.2.2 Substrate 157 7.2.2.1 Bioethanol from Starchy Mass by Fermentation 157 7.2.2.2 Bioethanol from Lignocellulosic Biomass 160 7.2.2.3 Bioethanol from Microalgae and Seaweeds 163 7.2.3 Future Prospects for Bioethanol 164 7.3 Biodiesel and Renewable Diesels from Biomass 166 7.3.1 Potential of Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel Substitute 168 7.3.2 Vegetable Oil Ester Based Biodiesel 169 7.3.3 Several Approaches to Biodiesel Synthesis 170 7.3.4 Sustainability of Biofuel Use 171 7.3.4.1 Food versus Fuel 171 7.3.4.2 Water Usage 171 7.3.4.3 Environmental Issues 171 7.3.5 Future Prospects 171 7.4 Perspective 172 List of Acronyms 172 References 173 8. Inside the Bioplastics World: An Alternative to Petroleum-based Plastics 181 Vincenzo Piemonte 8.1 Bioplastic Concept 181 8.2 Bioplastic Production Processes 183 8.2.1 PLA Production Process 183 8.2.2 Starch-based Bioplastic Production Process 185 8.3 Bioplastic Environmental Impact: Strengths and Weaknesses 186 8.3.1 Life Cycle Assessment Methodology 186 8.3.2 The Ecoindicator 99 Methodology: An End-Point Approach 187 8.3.3 Case Study 1: PLA versus PET Bottles 189 8.3.4 Case Study 2: Mater-Bi versus PE Shoppers 191 8.3.5 Land Use Change (LUC) Emissions and Bioplastics 193 8.4 Conclusions 195 Acknowledgement 196 References 196 9. Biosurfactants 199 Martinotti Maria Giovanna, Allegrone Gianna, Cavallo Massimo, and Fracchia Letizia 9.1 Introduction 199 9.2 State of the Art 200 9.2.1 Glycolipids 201 9.2.2 Lipopeptides 201 9.2.3 Fatty Acids, Neutral Lipids, and Phospholipids 204 9.2.4 Polymeric Biosurfactants 204 9.2.5 Particulate Biosurfactants 205 9.3 Production Technologies 205 9.3.1 Use of Renewable Substrates 205 9.3.2 Medium Optimization 209 9.3.3 Immobilization 211 9.4 Recovery of Biosurfactants 212 9.5 Application Fields 213 9.5.1 Environmental Applications 213 9.5.2 Biomedical Applications 217 9.5.2.1 Antimicrobial Activity 217 9.5.2.2 Anti-Adhesive Activity 218 9.5.3 Agricultural Applications 220 9.5.4 Biotechnological and Nanotechnological Applications 221 9.6 Future Prospects 225 References 225 10. Bioremediation of Water: A Sustainable Approach 241 Sudip Chakraborty, Jaya Sikder, Debolina Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti Mandal, and D. Lawrence Arockiasamy 10.1 Introduction 241 10.2 State-of-the-Art: Recent Development 242 10.3 Water Management 247 10.4 Overview of Bioremediation in Wastewater Treatment and Ground Water Contamination 250 10.5 Membrane Separation in Bioremediation 252 10.6 Case Studies 256 10.6.1 Bioremediation of Heavy Metals 256 10.6.2 Bioremediation of Nitrate Pollution 258 10.6.3 Bioremediation in the Petroleum Industry 259 10.7 Conclusions 260 List of Acronyms 261 References 262 11. Effective Remediation of Contaminated Soils by Eco-Compatible Physical, Biological, and Chemical Practices 267 F. Sannino and A. Piccolo 11.1 Introduction 267 11.2 Biological Methods (Microorganisms, Plants, Compost, and Biochar) 269 11.2.1 Microorganisms 269 11.2.2 Plants 273 11.2.3 Plant-Microorganism Associations: Mycorrhizal Fungi 275 11.2.4 Compost and Biochar 276 11.3 Physicochemical Methods 277 11.3.1 Humic Substances as Natural Surfactants 278 11.4 Chemical Methods 280 11.4.1 Metal-Porphyrins 282 11.4.2 Nanocatalysts 284 11.5 Conclusions 286 List of Symbols and Acronyms 288 Acknowledgments 288 References 288 12. Nanoparticles as a Smart Technology for Remediation 297 Giuseppe Chidichimo, Daniela Cupelli, Giovanni De Filpo, Patrizia Formoso, and Fiore Pasquale Nicoletta 12.1 Introduction 297 12.2 Silica Nanoparticles for Wastewater Treatment 298 12.2.1 Silica Nanoparticles: An Overview 298 12.2.2 Preparation of Nanosilica 299 12.2.3 Removal of Dyes by Silica Nanoparticles 299 12.2.4 Removal of Metallic Pollutants by Silica Nanoparticles 303 12.3 Magnetic Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications 305 12.3.1 Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Overview 305 12.3.2 Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles 306 12.3.2.1 Co-Precipitation 306 12.3.2.2 Thermal Decomposition 307 12.3.2.3 Hydrothermal Procedures 310 12.3.2.4 Microemulsions as Nanoreactors 311 12.3.2.5 Other Synthesis Methods 313 12.3.3 Characterization of Magnetic Nanoparticles 315 12.3.4 Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles 316 12.4 Titania Nanoparticles in Environmental Photo-Catalysis 317 12.4.1 Advanced Oxidation Processes 317 12.4.2 TiO2 Assisted Photo-Catalysis 320 12.4.2.1 TiO2 Assisted Photo-Catalysis of Phenol Compounds 321 12.4.2.2 TiO2 Assisted Photo-Catalysis of Dyes 322 12.4.2.3 Some Examples of TiO2 Assisted Photo-Catalysis 323 12.4.3 Developments in TiO2 Assisted Photo-Catalysis 324 12.5 Future Prospects: Is Nano Really Good for the Environment? 326 12.6 Conclusions 328 12.7 List of Abbreviations 328 References 329 Index 349