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Resilience : Why Things Bounce Back -- Paperback: Zolli, Andrew/ Healy, Ann Marie: BOOKS KINOKUNIYA
รายละเอียดหนังสือ
Resilience : Why Things Bounce Back -- Paperback
Resilience : Why Things Bounce Back -- Paperback
แต่งโดย Zolli, Andrew / Healy, Ann Marie
สำนักพิมพ์ : Headline Publishing Group
วันที่ตีพิมพ์ : 2012/07
Binding : Paperback
เลขที่ISBN : 9780755360345

ราคาบนระบบBookWeb : THB 599.00
ราคาสำหรับสมาชิกบัตร KPC : THB 539.00

ข้อมูลสินค้าในคลัง : มีสินค้าในร้าน ปกติใช้เวลาประมาณ 3 วันทำการเพื่อจัดส่ง
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รายละเอียดหนังสือ

All systems break down. Some bounce back, others do not. This is a book about why. RESILIENCE is a dazzling exposition of fresh thinking about how the world works. It covers business, economic, geographic and social systems in a thrillingly readable narrative. A wealth of absorbing examples are covered, from the link between US oil prices and the recent 'tortilla riots' in Mexico to what was really happening when the US government decided not to bail out Lehman Bros. RESILIENCE introduces completely new ideas, such as 'flipping' which is when a systems has been pulled out of shape so often it changes forever. The thinking in RESILIENCE has crucial implications for how to understand the world in which we live.refreshingly revealing.popular countries in the world.Crusade.

Contents
Preface; IntroductionIherosolimitana; Robert and the Gesta Francorum; Robert's relationship with other sources and value as a historical source; Robert as author: the theologian, the historiographer and the storyteller; Principles of translation. Translation of Robert the Monk's Historia Iherosolimitana: Sermo Apologeticus; Prologue; Book I: The Council of Clermont and the Crusade of Peter the Hermit: November 1095 - October 1096; Book II: The journey to Constantinople and negotiations there: October 1096 - April 1097; Book III: Nicaea, Dorylaeum and the arrival at Antioch: May 1097 - October 1097; Book IV: The siege of Antioch: October 1097 - February 1098; Book V: Events leading to the fall of Antioch: February 1098 - June 1098; Book VI: The Christians besieged in Antioch: June 1098; Book VII: Victory at Antioch: June 1098 - October 1098; Book VIII: From Antioch to Jerusalem: November 1098 - June 1099; Book IX: The fall of Jerusalem and the battle of Ascalon: June 1099 - August 1099. Appendix; Bibliography; Index.the engineer. Principles of design, planning and prototyping. Applied engineering systems. The engineering environment. Applied design, planning and prototyping. Index.GR HK HR HU ID IS IT JP KP KR LA LI LK LT LU LV MC MK MM MN MO MT MY NL NO NP PH PL PT RO RU SE SG SI SK TH TL TW UA VA VNSelected-response Item Formats 8. Automatic Item Generation 9. Formats and Guidelines for Survey Items Part III: Developing Constructed-response Test Items 10. Constructed-response Formats for Measuring Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities 11. Guidelines for Writing Constructed-response Items 12. Scoring Constructed-response Items Part IV: Unique Applications for Selected-response and Constructed-response Formats 13. Developing Items to Measure Writing Ability 14. Developing and Validating Items for Professional Credentialing Tests 15. Developing Items for Accessibility by Individuals with Exceptionalities Part V: Validity Evidence Arising from Item Development and Item Response Validation 16. Validity Evidence Coming from Item Development Procedures 17. Validity Evidence from Statistical Study of Objectively-scored Test Items 18. Validity Evidence from Statistical Study of Subjectively-scored Items 19. Issues Involving Item Responses and Item Validation Part VI: Part VI: The Future of Item Development and Validation 20. The Future for Item Development and ValidationFailures 17. The Present Situation and the Future ChallengesExamining Internal and External Influences on Communication Exchanges between Parents and Their Boomerang Children Sally Vogl-Bauer 18. Stepfamilies Interfacing Outside the Home: Barriers to Stepparent/stepchild Communication with Educational, Medical, and Legal personnel. Amy J. Johnson, Elizabeth A. Craig, Michel M. Haigh, Eileen S. Gilchrist, Lindsey T. Lane, and Nakia S. Welch 19. Interactions Between Gay and Lesbian Foster Parents, the Children Placed in their Home, and the Surrounding Community. Dennis Grady Patrick and John Palladino 20. Commentary: Communication and Evolving Caregiving Roles & Relationships Dawn O. Braithwaite and Jordan Soliz Epilogue Kathleen M. GalvinChapter 13: The Industrial Age Chapter 14: Modernism Chapter 15: The Contemporary SpiritBD BE BF BG BH BI BJ BM BN BO BR BS BT BW BY BZ CC CD CF CG CH CI CK CL CM CN CO CR CS CU CV CX CY CZ DE DJ DK DM DO DZ EC EE EG EH ER ES ET FI FJ FK FM FO FR GA GD GE GF GH GI GL GM GN GP GQ GR GS GT GU GW GY HK HM HN HR HT HU ID IL IN IO IQ IS IT JM JO JP KE KG KH KI KM KN KP KR KW KY KZ LA LB LC LI LK LR LS LT LU LV LY MA MC MD MG MH MK ML MM MN MO MP MQ MR MS MT MU MV MW MX MY MZ NA NC NE NF NG NI NL NO NP NR NU OM PA PE PF PG PH PK PL PM PN PR PS PT PW PY QA RE RO RU RW SA SB SC SD SE SG SH SI SJ SK SL SM SN SO SR ST SV SY SZ TC TD TF TG TH TJ TK TL TM TN TO TR TT TV TW TZ UA UG UM UY UZ VA VC VE VG VI VN VU WF WS YE YT ZM ZWBehavior 11.1 Band Structure of Materials 11.2 Electronic Properties 11.3 Conductors 11.4 Semiconductors 11.5 Solid-State Devices Chapter 12: Thermal Behavior 12.1 Heat Capacity 12.2 Thermal Expansion 12.3 Thermal Conductivity Chapter 13: Materials Selection and Design 13.1 Ranking Procedures 13.2 Ashby PlotsBG BH BI BJ BM BN BO BR BS BT BV BW BY BZ CC CD CF CG CH CI CK CL CM CN CO CR CS CU CV CX CY CZ DE DJ DK DM DO DZ EC EE EG EH ER ES ET FI FJ FK FM FO FR GA GD GE GF GH GI GL GM GN GP GQ GR GT GW GY HK HM HN HR HT HU ID IL IN IO IQ IR IS IT JM JO JP KE KG KH KI KM KN KP KR KW KY KZ LA LB LC LI LK LR LS LT LU LV LY MA MC MD MG MH MK ML MM MN MO MQ MR MS MT MU MV MW MX MY MZ NA NC NE NF NG NI NL NO NP NR NU OM PA PE PF PG PH PK PL PM PN PS PT PW PY QA RE RO RU RW SA SB SC SD SE SG SH SI SJ SK SL SM SN SO SR ST SV SY SZ TC TD TF TG TH TJ TK TL TM TN TO TR TT TV TW TZ UA UG UY UZ VA VC VE VG VN VU WF WS YE YT ZM ZWCO CR CS CU CV CX CY CZ DE DJ DK DM DO DZ EC EE EG EH ER ES ET FI FJ FK FM FO FR GA GD GE GF GH GI GL GM GN GP GQ GR GS GT GU GW GY HK HM HN HR HT HU ID IL IN IO IQ IS IT JM JO JP KE KG KH KI KM KN KP KR KW KY KZ LA LB LC LI LK LR LS LT LU LV LY MA MC MD MG MH MK ML MM MN MO MP MQ MR MS MT MU MV MW MX MY MZ NA NC NE NF NG NI NL NO NP NR NU OM PA PE PF PG PH PK PL PM PN PR PS PT PW PY QA RE RO RU RW SA SB SC SD SE SG SH SI SJ SK SL SM SN SO SR ST SV SY SZ TC TD TF TG TH TJ TK TL TM TN TO TR TT TV TW TZ UA UG UM UY UZ VA VC VE VG VI VN VU WF WS YE YT ZM ZWVortices and Downwash 348 7.3.2 Case of Elliptic Spanwise Circulation Distribution 351 7.3.3 Technique for General Spanwise Circulation Distribution 357 7.3.4 Lift on the Wing 362 7.3.5 Vortex-Induced Drag 362 7.3.6 Some Final Comments on Lifting-Line Theory 373 7.4 Panel Methods 375 7.4.1 Boundary Conditions 376 7.4.2 Solution Methods 377 7.5 Vortex Lattice Method 379 7.5.1 Velocity Induced by a General Horseshoe Vortex 382 7.5.2 Application of the Boundary Conditions 386 7.5.3 Relations for a Planar Wing 387 7.6 Factors Affecting Drag Due-to-Lift at Subsonic Speeds 401 7.7 Delta Wings 404 7.8 Leading-Edge Extensions 414 7.9 Asymmetric Loads on the Fuselage at High Angles of Attack 418 7.9.1 Asymmetric Vortex Shedding 419 7.9.2 Wakelike Flows 422 7.10 Flow Fields for Aircraft at High Angles of Attack 422 7.11 Unmanned Air Vehicle Wings 424 7.12 Summary 426 Problems 426 References 428 CHAPTER 8 DYNAMICS OF A COMPRESSIBLE FLOW FIELD 431 8.1 Thermodynamic Concepts 432 8.1.1 Specific Heats 432 8.1.2 Additional Important Relations 435 8.1.3 Second Law of Thermodynamics and Reversibility 435 8.1.4 Speed of Sound 438 8.2 Adiabatic Flow in a Variable-Area Streamtube 441 8.3 Isentropic Flow in a Variable-Area Streamtube 445 8.4 Converging-diverging Nozzles 451 8.5 Characteristic Equations and Prandtl-Meyer Flows 454 8.6 Shock Waves 462 8.7 Viscous Boundary Layer 473 8.7.1 Effects of Compressibility 476 8.8 Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions 480 8.9 Shock/Shock Interactions 482 8.10 The Role of Experiments for Generating Information Defining the Flow Field 486 8.10.1 Ground-Based Tests 486 8.10.2 Flight Tests 490 8.11 Comments About The Scaling/Correction Process(es) for Relatively Clean Cruise Configurations 494 8.12 Summary 495 Problems 495 References 502 CHAPTER 9 COMPRESSIBLE, SUBSONIC FLOWS AND TRANSONIC FLOWS 505 9.1 Compressible, Subsonic Flow 506 9.1.1 Linearized Theory for Compressible Subsonic Flow About a Thin Wing at Relatively Small Angles of Attack 507 9.1.2 The Gothert Transformation 509 9.1.3 Additional Compressibility Corrections 512 9.1.4 The Motivation for Determining the Critical Mach Number 513 9.1.5 Critical Mach Number 513 9.1.6 Drag Divergence Mach Number 516 9.2 Transonic Flow Past Unswept Airfoils 517 9.3 Wave Drag Reduction by Design 526 9.3.1 Airfoil Contour Wave Drag Approaches 526 9.3.2 Supercritical Airfoil Sections 526 9.4 Swept Wings at Transonic Speeds 527 9.4.1 Wing-Body Interactions and the "Area Rule" 529 9.4.2 Second-Order Area-Rule Considerations 538 9.4.3 Forward Swept Wing 540 9.5 Transonic Aircraft 543 9.6 Summary 548 Problems 548 References 548 CHAPTER 10 TWO-DIMENSIONAL, SUPERSONIC FLOWS AROUND THIN AIRFOILS 551 10.1 Linear Theory 553 10.1.1 Lift 555 10.1.2 Drag 556 10.1.3 Pitch Moment 558 10.2 Second-Order Theory (Busemann's Theory) 561 10.3 Shock-Expansion Technique 566 10.4 Summary 572 Problems 572 References 575 CHAPTER 11 SUPERSONIC FLOWS OVER WINGS AND AIRPLANE CONFIGURATIONS 577 11.1 General Remarks About Lift and Drag 579 11.2 General Remarks About Supersonic Wings 581 11.3 Governing Equation and Boundary Conditions 583 11.4 Consequences of Linearity 584 11.5 Solution Methods 585 11.6 Conical-Flow Method 585 11.6.1 Rectangular Wings 586 11.6.2 Swept Wings 591 11.6.3 Delta and Arrow Wings 595 11.7 Singularity-Distribution Method 598 11.7.1 Find the Pressure Distribution Given the Configuration 600 11.7.2 Numerical Method for Calculating the Pressure Distribution Given the Configuration 608 11.7.3 Numerical Method for the Determination of Camber Distribution 622 11.8 Design Considerations for Supersonic Aircraft 625 11.9 Some Comments about the Design of the SST and of the HSCT 627 11.9.1 The Supersonic Transport (SST), the Concorde 627 11.9.2 The High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) 629 11.9.3 Reducing the Sonic Boom 630 11.9.4 Classifying High-Speed Aircraft Designs 631 11.10 Slender Body Theory 634 11.11 Base Drag 636 11.12 Aerodynamic Interaction 639 11.13 Aerodynamic Analysis for Complete Configurations in a Supersonic Free Stream 642 11.14 Summary 643 Problems 644 References 646 CHAPTER 12 HYPERSONIC FLOWS 649 12.1 The Five Distinguishing Characteristics 652 12.1.1 Thin Shock Layers 652 12.1.2 Entropy Layers 653 12.1.3 Viscous-Inviscid Interactions 653 12.1.4 High Temperature Effects 654 12.1.5 Low-Density Flows 655 12.2 Newtonian Flow Model 657 12.3 Stagnation Region Flow-Field Properties 660 12.4 Modified Newtonian Flow 665 12.5 High L/D Hypersonic Configurations-Waveriders 682 12.6 Aerodynamic Heating 691 12.6.1 Similarity Solutions for Heat Transfer 694 12.7 A Hypersonic Cruiser for the Twenty-First Century? 697 12.8 Importance of Interrelating CFD, Ground-Test Data, and Flight-Test Data 700 12.9 Boundary-Layer-Transition Methodology 702 12.10 Summary 706 Problems 706 References 708 CHAPTER 13 AERODYNAMIC DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS 711 13.1 High-Lift Configurations 712 13.1.1 Increasing the Area 712 13.1.2 Increasing the Lift Coefficient 713 13.1.3 Flap Systems 716 13.1.4 Multi-element Airfoils 719 13.1.5 Power-Augmented Lift 723 13.2 Circulation Control Wing 725 13.3 Design Considerations for Tactical Military Aircraft 727 13.4 Drag Reduction 731 13.4.1 Variable-Twist, Variable-Camber Wings 731 13.4.2 Laminar-Flow Control 734 13.4.3 Wingtip Devices 737 13.4.4 Wing Planform 740 13.5 Development of an Airframe Modification to Improve the Mission Effectiveness of an Existing Airplane 742 13.5.1 The EA-6B 742 13.5.2 The Evolution of the F-16 745 13.5.3 External Carriage of Stores 752 13.5.4 Additional Comments 758 13.6 Considerations for Wing/Canard, Wing/Tail, and Tailless Configurations 758 13.7 Comments on the F-15 Design 763 13.8 The Design of the F-22 764 13.9 The Design of the F-35 767 13.10 Summary 770 Problems 770 References 772 CHAPTER 14 TOOLS FOR DEFINING THE AERODYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT 775 14.1 Computational Tools 777 14.1.1 Semiempirical Methods 777 14.1.2 Surface Panel Methods for Inviscid Flows 778 14.1.3 Euler Codes for Inviscid Flow Fields 779 14.1.4 Two-Layer Flow Models 779 14.1.5 Computational Techniques That Treat the Entire Flow Field in a Unified Fashion 780 14.1.6 Integrating the Diverse Computational Tools 781 14.2 Establishing the Credibility of CFD Simulations 783 14.3 Ground-Based Test Programs 785 14.4 Flight-Test Programs 788 14.5 Integration of Experimental and Computational Tools: The Aerodynamic Design Philosophy 789 14.6 Summary 790 References 790 APPENDIX A THE EQUATIONS OF MOTION WRITTEN IN CONSERVATION FORM 793 APPENDIX B A COLLECTION OF OFTEN USED TABLES 799 ANSWERS TO SELECTED PROBLEMS 806BG BH BI BJ BM BN BO BR BS BT BV BW BY BZ CC CD CF CG CH CI CK CL CM CN CO CR CS CU CV CX CY CZ DE DJ DK DM DO DZ EC EE EG EH ER ES ET FI FJ FK FM FO FR GA GD GE GF GH GI GL GM GN GP GQ GR GT GW GY HK HM HN HR HT HU ID IL IN IO IQ IR IS IT JM JO JP KE KG KH KI KM KN KP KR KW KY KZ LA LB LC LI LK LR LS LT LU LV LY MA MC MD MG MH MK ML MM MN MO MQ MR MS MT MU MV MW MX MY MZ NA NC NE NF NG NI NL NO NP NR NU OM PA PE PF PG PH PK PL PM PN PS PT PW PY QA RE RO RU RW SA SB SC SD SE SG SH SI SJ SK SL SM SN SO SR ST SV SY SZ TC TD TF TG TH TJ TK TL TM TN TO TR TT TV TW TZ UA UG UY UZ VA VC VE VG VN VU WF WS YE YT ZM ZWformulation for a linear strain triangle Selected readings Problems 19 Component mode synthesis 19.1 Introduction 19.2 Fixed interface methods 19.2.1 Fixed interface normal modes 19.2.2 Constraint modes 19.2.3 Transformation of coordinates 19.2.4 Illustrative example 19.3 Free interface method 19.3.1 Free interface normal modes 19.3.2 Attachment modes 19.3.3 Inertia relief attachment modes 19.3.4 Residual flexibility attachment modes 19.3.5 Transformation of coordinates 19.3.6 Illustrative example 19.4 Hybrid method 19.4.1 Experimental determination of modal parameters 19.4.2 Experimental determination of the static constraint modes 19.4.3 Component modes and transformation of component matrices 19.4.4 Illustrative example Selected readings Problems 20 Analysis of nonlinear response 20.1 Introduction 20.2 Single-degree-of freedom system 20.2.1 Central difference method 20.2.2 Newmark's beta Method 20.3 Errors involved in numerical integration of nonlinear systems 20.4 Multiple degree-of-freedom system 20.4.1 Explicit integration 20.4.2 Implicit integration 20.4.3 Iterations within a time step Selected readings Problems Answers to selected problems Index