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We Now Know : Rethinking Cold War History (Reprint): Gaddis, John Lewis: BOOKS KINOKUNIYA
书籍资料
We Now Know : Rethinking Cold War History (Reprint)
We Now Know : Rethinking Cold War History (Reprint)
作者: Gaddis, John Lewis
出版社 : Oxford Univ Pr
出版日期 : 1998/07
Binding : Paperback
ISBN : 9780198780717

BookWeb售价 : S$ 71.66
纪伊国屋KPC会员价 : S$ 64.49

库存资料 : 目前供货中心有库存。
通常在5个工作天内递送
语言 : English
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书籍简介
Source: ENG
Academic Level: Undergraduate
Review:
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Did the Soviet Union want world revolution? Why did the USSR send missiles to Cuba? What made the Cold War last as long as it did? This text presents a comprehensive comparative history of the conflict from its origins, to it most dangerous moment - the Cuban Missile Crisis.
The end of the Cold War makes it possible, for the first time, to begin writing its history from a truly international perspective, one reflecting Soviet, East European, and Chinese as well as American and West European viewpoints. In a major departure from his earlier scholarship, John Lewis Gaddis, an American authority on the United States and the Cold War, has written a comprehensive comparative history of that conflict from its origins through to its most dangerous moment - the Cuban Missile Crisis. The text contains insights into the role of ideology, democracy, economics, alliances, and nuclear weapons, as well as major reinterpretations of Stalin, Truman, Khrushchev, Mao, Eisenhower, and Kennedy. It suggests solutions to long-standing puzzles: Did the Soviet Union want world revolution? Why was Germany divided? Who started the Korean War? What did the Americans mean by "massive retaliation"? When did the Sino-Soviet split begin? Why did the USSR send missiles to Cuba?

Contents
Dividing the world; Cold War empires - Europe; Cold War empires - Asia; nuclear weapons and the early Cold War; the German question; the third world; economics, ideology, and alliance solidarity; nuclear weapons and the escalation of the Cold War; the Cuban Missile Crisis; the new Cold War history - first impressions.